Top 40 Books I Read in 2016

40. Marcella Mariotti, La lingua giapponese, 2014

39. Film Crit Hulk, Screenwriting 101, 2013

38. Sandra Newman & Howard Mittelmark, How Not to Write a Novel, 2008

37. John Truby, The Anatomy of Story: 22 Steps to Becoming a Master Storyteller, 2007

36. Plato, Crito, 4th century BC

35. Luciano Canepari & Francesca Miscio, Japanese Pronunciation & Accents: Geo-social Applications of the Natural Phonetics & Tonetics Method, 2016

34. Bryan Lee O’Malley, Seconds, 2014

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33. Thomas Bernhard, Old Masters: A Comedy, 1985

32. Ödön von Horváth, Youth Without God, 1937

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31. John N. Gray, The Silence of Animals: On Progress and Other Modern Myths, 2013

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The Enormous Extension of Our Being Which We Owe to Literature

“Good reading, therefore, though it is not essentially an affectional or moral or intellectual activity, has something in common with all three. In love we escape from our self into one other. In the moral sphere, every act of justice or charity involves putting ourselves in the other person’s place and thus transcending our own competitive particularity. In coming to understand anything we are rejecting the facts as they are for us in favour of the facts as they are. The primary impulse of each is to maintain and aggrandise himself. The secondary impulse is to go out of the self, to correct its provincialism and heal its loneliness. In love, in virtue, in the pursuit of knowledge, and in the reception of the arts, we are doing this. Obviously this process can be described either as an enlargement or as a temporary annihilation of the self. But that is an old paradox; ‘he that loseth his life shall save it’.

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C. S. Lewis: Put Away Childish Things—Including the Fear of Childishness

“Critics who treat adult as a term of approval, instead of as a merely descriptive term, cannot be adult themselves. To be concerned about being grown up, to admire the grown up because it is grown up, to blush at the suspicion of being childish; these things are the marks of childhood and adolescence. And in childhood and adolescence they are, in moderation, healthy symptoms. Young things ought to want to grow. But to carry on into middle life or even into early manhood this concern about being adult is a mark of really arrested development. When I was ten, I read fairy tales in secret and would have been ashamed if I had been found doing so. Now that I am fifty I read them openly. When I became a man I put away childish things, including the fear of childishness and the desire to be very grown up.

C. S. Lewis, “On Three Ways of Writing for Children” (1952)